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Norton's second book is a change of tone

Wednesday, 24th October, 2018 12:14pm
Norton's second book is a change of tone

A Keeper by Graham Norton

Norton's second book is a change of tone

A Keeper by Graham Norton

By Aoife Burke

GRAHAM Norton’s debut novel Holding won deserved critical acclaim, with its fond explication of tiny rural communities, drenched in observational humour and featuring a whole host of flawed, sympathetic, wholly believable characters offset by the truly affecting stories and pathos that lie beneath the bumbling, slightly ridiculous surface. His follow up is unexpectedly quite different; if Holding was the gateway drug to Norton’s literary career, A Keeper is the Class A.
Elizabeth Keane has returned from her adopted home in New York to Buncarragh, a fictional town in the South East to take care of her late mother’s estate. Typically of those who have left their repressive, stifling childhood town behind, Elizabeth hopes that it will be a quick in-and-out trip, hopefully unencumbered by too many visits from her cousins, their surprisingly glamorous spouses and an aunt and uncle who live comfortably above the hardware shop given to her mother’s brother on their own mother’s bequest.
That Elizabeth’s mother was left the family home is a brittle bone of contention still, and her stubborn side wants to spend some time there to see if it’s worth keeping on, since she as an only child living abroad will have little use for it.
A sleepover in the house she used to call home dredges up feelings she hoped were buried.

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